Tag: civil liberties
La Rivoluzione Tramite l’Arte
[Di Logan Glitterbomb. Originale pubblicato su Center for a Stateless Society il 10 ottobre 2016 con il titolo Revolution Through Art. Traduzione di Enrico Sanna.] Il film Snowden, ultima opera del pupillo della Troma Films Oliver Stone, è approdato nei cinema. Se altri suoi film a sfondo storico sono stati spesso criticati per il pressappochismo…
Revolution Through Art
Recently, Troma Films alum Oliver Stone’s newest film Snowden hit theaters. While Stone’s often historical films have been called into question for their accuracy (*cough*cough* JFK *cough*cough*), this film is the product of several months of conversations with Edward Snowden himself who hopefully kept the record straight. But what’s most impressive about the movie is…
Autonomy and Action
“By striving to do the impossible, man has always achieved what is possible. Those who have cautiously done no more than they believed possible have never taken a single step forward.” – Attributed to Mikhail Bakunin in Paolo Novaresio’s The Explorers ŸŸŸA revolutionary is someone who knows the political world in which they want to…
Trump, Saddam, and the Presumption of Innocence
The horrifying thing about Trump’s recent remarks about Saddam Hussein is not that he expressed admiration for the late Iraqi dictator — in fact Trump called him a “bad guy” three times. What is horrifying is that Trump seemed envious that Saddam could “kill terrorists” without due process — the most important element of which…
When Prisons Enable Crime
The dominant belief in our society is that prisons are a necessary tool to fight crime. Prisons are often thought to counter crime in at least three ways: 1. Deterrence: The expectation of a prison sentence increases the perceived cost of committing a crime, thus creating incentives not to commit crimes. 2. Incapacitation: By coercively…
A Prison by Any Other Name
Some critics of mass incarceration see the contemporary carceral state as a result of the abolition of state-run mental hospitals. For example, German Lopez of Vox recently wrote that “America’s criminal justice system has, in many ways, become a substitute for the US’s largely gutted mental health system.” Yet when the mental health system was “gutted,” what…
Plea Bargains vs. High School Civics Fantasies
“In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury of the state and district wherein the crime shall have been committed, which district shall have been previously ascertained by law, and to be informed of the nature and cause of the accusation; to be…
Obama Suspends TV Coverage of Middle East
WASHINGTON, D.C. — The Departments of Justice and Homeland Security announced today that the government will forbid the television news media from covering the conflict in the Middle East because “displays of U.S. military operations there have the potential to radicalize Americans against the Obama administration’s foreign policy and provoke terrorism in the United States.”…
Don’t Say “Radical” if You Mean “Violent”
It’s about time someone challenged the phrase radical Islamic terrorism. The most objectionable part is the word radical since it is now popularly associated with aggression — violence against innocents — as an acceptable means to politico-religious ends. But nothing about the word radical implies approval of aggression or terrorism. Rather, the word signifies an approach that goes to the…
Contro l’Indulgenza Selettiva
Il 13 luglio Obama ha annunciato l’intenzione di concedere uno sconto di pena a 46 detenuti. Dozzine di questi sono condannati per reati legati alla droga e altri reati non violenti. Tredici erano ergastolani. Una buona notizia, senza dubbio. È bene festeggiare ogni vittoria, per quanto piccola, nella lotta contro l’industria carceraria razzista. Gli sconti…
The Boston Marathon Two Years Later – A Policeman’s Delight on Feed 44
C4SS Feed 44 presents Chad Nelson‘s “The Boston Marathon Two Years Later – A Policeman’s Delight” read by Joey Clark and edited by Nick Ford. For Constitution-worshippers it is one more tear in the Fourth Amendment, which purportedly guarantees Americans protection from random and baseless searches by the state. But the Fourth Amendment is regularly…
Against Selective Leniency
On July 13, President Obama announced that he will commute the sentences of 46 imprisoned individuals. Among them are several dozen drug offenders and a score of other nonviolent lawbreakers. Thirteen of them were serving life in prison. This is undeniably good news. Any victory, no matter how small, in the fight against the racist prison-industrial complex is worth celebrating. Obama’s…
The Boston Marathon Two Years Later — A Policeman’s Delight
With the second anniversary of the Boston Marathon bombing upon us, NPR is running a series called “The Road Ahead”. In its daily segments, NPR examines how everyday lives have been affected by the horrific events two years ago. One unfortunate but seemingly inevitable part of that road entails law enforcement’s stepped-up abuses of its…
The Weekly Abolitionist: Sex Work and the Police State
This weekend I had the pleasure of attending Students For Liberty’s New Orleans Regional Conference. It was a delightful event, featuring a talk by C4SS’s own Roderick Long along with many other radical, principled, and insightful speakers. One of the most interesting presentations was by Maggie McNeill, a retired sex worker who blogs at The…
Don’t Reform the Surveillance State, Route Around It on Feed 44
C4SS Feed 44 presents Nathan Goodman‘s “Don’t Reform the Surveillance State, Route Around It” read Christopher King and edited by Nick Ford. Moreover, the state tends to secure its own interests and those of concentrated special interest groups first and foremost. Bills that pose a substantial threat to the NSA, their telecom company collaborators or profiteers…
The Weekly Abolitionist: The Pernicious Consequences of Mandatory Minimums
Mandatory minimum sentences have been receiving a fair bit of scrutiny lately, largely due to the efforts of Families Against Mandatory Minimums (FAMM). And rightly so. Mandatory minimums remove discretion and context from sentencing, resulting in grossly unjust and wildly disproportionate sentences for minor offenses. Moreover, they’ve caused some troubling shifts in who has discretionary…
The Weekly Abolitionist: Pretrial Detention as a Human Rights Crisis
A new report from the Open Society Justice Initiative documents the overuse of pretrial detention around the globe. The report estimates that around 3.3 million people are currently incarcerated awaiting trial. These people have yet to be convicted of any crime, yet they are locked in cages and subjected to brutal human rights abuses. Martin Schoenteich…
The Weekly Abolitionist: Gun Control, Structural Racism, and the Prison State
An excellent article published last week by Radley Balko in The Washington Post explores the racially discriminatory consequences of gun control laws in the United States, as illustrated through the lens of several recent news stories. Balko begins by discussing the arrest of Shaneen Allen: Last October, Shaneen Allen, 27, was pulled over in Atlantic…
Punizione Collettiva e Terrore di Stato Israeliano
Il rapimento e l’assassinio di tre adolescenti israeliani è un crimine odioso. Ma la risposta del governo israeliano è dal canto suo un’orgia di crimini violenti. Quando qualcuno commette un crimine contro qualcun altro, solo l’autore di questo crimine dovrebbe essere considerato responsabile. Non la famiglia o i compagni di camera, non quelli della sua…
The Weekly Abolitionist: Jury Nullification in The Nation
On July 7th, Molly Knefel published a great piece on jury nullification in The Nation. Knefel opens by discussing the trial of Cecily McMillan, an Occupy Wall Street protester who was convicted of “assaulting” a police officer who had assaulted her, and sentenced to a prison term that most of the jurors who convicted her…
Free Markets & Capitalism?
Markets Not Capitalism
Organization Theory
Conscience of an Anarchist